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The Wild, Wild World outside the [ box ]

Client: Canadian Women’s Foundation

Agency: DDB Toronto

When I saw this on TV for the first time, I clapped. Because, damn it, I love a well-done pro-bono ad. This one is so simple, and it gets the point across in so many ways. We need to spend more time discussing the reality of violence against women. It’s heartbreaking to know that the statistic that 50% of girls in Canada are physically or sexually abused in their lifetime. It is astounding to accept that as the truth in my beloved Canada.

But it is. And this simple and succinct ad brings a scary reality to the surface, making you realize that this kind of thing doesn’t happen to other people in a far away country where things are different. Violence against women happens every day, in your neighbourhood, and maybe even to your friends and family.

In a recent article in Marketing Magazine, CWF vice-president remarked that “It’s an issues campaign to stir the pot and build education about the issue…The creative goal is to dispel the idea that everything is fine for women in an era of equality.” 

Indeed. This spot hits the nail square on the head.

Client:Terra Internet

Agency:DDB Mexico

Oh the simplicity! Dog poo = WiFi. Who knew you could pair these two things together? This seems like it’s more of a publicity stunt than actual campaign work, but maybe it will help alleviate some of the unfortunate poo-on-shoes situation that many of us are familiar with.

I just feel sorry for the guy who has to deal with that machine afterward…

(via AdFreak)

Client: Budweiser

Agency: DDB

Yes! A beer commercial with heart! This is packed full of a couple things that warrant discussion. First, dealing with the US soldiers coming home from the middle east (in wake of Osama’s assassination perhaps?). This is a heavy topic, and I like that Bud is taking it to heart and turning into a piece of creative for the brand. Secondly, the ambiguity of the relationship between the soldier and the guy he calls. Are they brothers, best friends…or, dare I say, boyfriends? Is this an homage to the defeat of the US “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy? I like that it doesn’t attempt to make a clear, definable marking of who they are to each other. Because, really, it doesn’t matter.

Regardless of some of the politics in this spot, it’s nice to see a beer company try something a little more emotional on for size. No, it won’t win a Gold Lion…but it makes Bud look like a brand that cares.

Client: The Parisians (band)

Agency: DDB Paris

This is kind of clever. Though, I don’t really see why you would want to do it…I can see why you might sneakily download it on your friend’s computer and see if he/she notices…but other than that, it’s really about 2 minutes of fun before it gets old.

My personal favourite was “Kurt Cobain shot himself again after he heard this album.” Other than that, it’s a cheap thrill.

A French band that wishes they were as classic as the Ramones, as cool as The Strokes, and as arrogant as The Sex Pistols. Sorry guys - pranking iTunes doesn’t make you punk. Neither does soliciting the services of one of the biggest advertising agencies in the world. The music is decent but it hardly warrants the self-proclaimed “best band in the world” title.

Nice typography though. At least the case study looked the part…

Update: I was a little harsh. I checked them out further, and they are pretty decent as a band. But this execution felt a little weak and irrelevant. They sound like a mixture between The Arctic Monkeys and the Kooks, with a certain…je ne sais quoi. You know…because they’re French.

Client: Volkswagen “The Fun Theory”

Agency: DDB

Credit to my dear friend Michelle, who posted this on Twitter like a champ.

Fantastic, fantastic, fantastic out of home branding. That’s all I have to really say about it. Volkswagen and DDB cannot stop the magic! The brand has such an incredible history with successful, innovative and above all creative campaigns and this is just another one. The digital tie-in with The Fun Theory website is awesome.

Totally reminds me of the movie Big. If only someone had managed to get “Chopsticks” going…

(click photo to zoom in)
Client: Papercut
Agency: DDB Stockholm
This, to me, is a very neo-Don Draper approach to print advertising. It’s strangely refeshing though because, let’s be honest, who writes in long copy anymore (did they ever?) It remineds me immediately of the Mad Men episode in which Don goes rogue and creates an anti-tobacco print ad when his agency gets ditched by Lucky Strike.
However, I don’t really like how the copywriter draws references himself towards the end.  As you read this, you’re kind of imagining all of this happening, either to yourself, or to some character that is being developed - like in a book, or a movie (which is fitting, seeing as the client is a pop culture/entertainment shop). But then he mentions himself and the bubble is kind burst, and direct attention is drawn to the fact that you are reading a ad that was created by someone who works in advertising. You kind of feel stupid for a second…as if perhaps you were fooled?
That being said, I like it. It’s unique, different, and even clever (“Hey ho, let’s go”). But, how long is the average person going to spend reading something like this? Probably not as long as an ad nerd like me (or at least not think about it nearly as much). That’s the problem with ads like this - they are created for people who love advertising, who study it, who analyze it. They are made with the hopes of impressing the panel of Gold Lion judges at Cannes. Ads like this are not created for the consumer; they are created for other ad men people.
So, the advertising industry is self-indulgent. WHO KNEW?!

(click photo to zoom in)

Client: Papercut

Agency: DDB Stockholm

This, to me, is a very neo-Don Draper approach to print advertising. It’s strangely refeshing though because, let’s be honest, who writes in long copy anymore (did they ever?) It remineds me immediately of the Mad Men episode in which Don goes rogue and creates an anti-tobacco print ad when his agency gets ditched by Lucky Strike.

However, I don’t really like how the copywriter draws references himself towards the end.  As you read this, you’re kind of imagining all of this happening, either to yourself, or to some character that is being developed - like in a book, or a movie (which is fitting, seeing as the client is a pop culture/entertainment shop). But then he mentions himself and the bubble is kind burst, and direct attention is drawn to the fact that you are reading a ad that was created by someone who works in advertising. You kind of feel stupid for a second…as if perhaps you were fooled?

That being said, I like it. It’s unique, different, and even clever (“Hey ho, let’s go”). But, how long is the average person going to spend reading something like this? Probably not as long as an ad nerd like me (or at least not think about it nearly as much). That’s the problem with ads like this - they are created for people who love advertising, who study it, who analyze it. They are made with the hopes of impressing the panel of Gold Lion judges at Cannes. Ads like this are not created for the consumer; they are created for other ad men people.

So, the advertising industry is self-indulgent. WHO KNEW?!

Tagged with:  #advertsing  #DDB  #Papercut